SB2G – Using Simplified Acquisition to Raise Small Business Goals

Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), Part 13, lays out a variety of purchasing methods collectively known as simplified acquisition to facilitate Government buyers in acquiring supplies and services.

Why Open Source Software is Good for the Government: Part 4 – What Next?

Even with the many benefits of open source software (OSS), misconceptions of open source software persists. One of the hurdles seems to be that the government acquisition community is not as familiar with the variety of products and services as they could be.

Why Open Source Software is Good for the Government: Part 3 – OSS Adoption

Since the 2009 OSD memorandum supporting open source software, DOD has been making strides in the use of open source software, but there is a long way to go.

Why Open Source Software is Good for the Government: Part 2 – Cost Savings

Money can be saved in almost any IT application being developed, which is perhaps the most compelling reason that government should consider open source software for all projects.

  • Permalink Gallery

    Why Open Source Software is Good for the Government: Part 1 – An Introduction to OSS

Why Open Source Software is Good for the Government: Part 1 – An Introduction to OSS

In these days of tight budgets, the government has to look at every possible area to achieve cost savings. Using more open source software in government IT systems is a good way to start.

Contract Types for Software Development

Having spent 33+ years in Federal Government service in both Contracting and Information Technology and now as an IT contractor, I’ve been pondering the current situation in contracting for IT services, especially software development. I’ve come to the conclusion that we’re in a real pickle!

Rule #1 of contract type selection is to place as much risk on the contractor as is practicable. We’ve been at the task of software development in Government-Contractor relationships for a few decades now (the Government used to use its own programmers, but that’s another blog post).

Conventional contracting wisdom is that if a process is well known and practitioners of the process are abundant then the amount of risk to either party is low and therefore firm, fixed price is the appropriate contract type. As a COTR and SOO/SOW writer I engaged more than one contracting officer in a discussion of the difficulties associated with this approach. Either the Government defaults to the straight-line method (“just bill the same amount every month”) or each system change is treated as a task order with its own price. The latter is much more in line with what FAR and DFARS envisions but it is also fraught with difficulty.

The other principle for when FFP is the appropriate contract type is that the requirements are well known. Requirements definition for software, when done correctly, is exacting. Ensuring that the software users’ needs are met requires details about data, processes, inputs, outputs, roles, permissions, formats, communications protocols and reporting. Even the best requirements writers inadvertently leave gaps in requirements. Once the requirements get to the developers there is often more than one way to produce the same outcome, each with a different cost. Most of […]

Purchasing GFM and CFM from DLA Stock using DOD EMALL

In my last post, I discussed how DOD EMALL is being used by Performance Based Logistics (PBL) and Contractor Logistics Support (CLS) contractors as a price research tool for Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) inventory. Today we are going to discuss how DOD EMALL is being used to purchase that DLA inventory.

Simplified Acquisition and the DOD EMALL

With over a thousand vendors and 30+M items, the DOD EMALL provides ample competition and meets each of the FAR simplified acquisition stated goals.

Congress Trying to Raise Small Business goals, but SB Success Rates are Down

The House version of the fiscal 2013 National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 4310) recommends raising the Small business goals to 25%. Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.), along with Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-La.), chairwoman of the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, introduced the Small Business Goaling Act (S. 3213) on May 22. It would raise the annual prime contracting goal by 2 percentage points, from 23 percent of contract dollars spent with small businesses to 25 percent. It also would raise agency subcontracting goals for small businesses from 35.9 percent to 40 percent.

The bill would also put the onus of succeeding at the contracting goals on the senior executives at an agency. Evaluators would have to consider in their performance how they did in meeting the contracting goals. The goals would become another factor in evaluations, along with productivity, efficiency and meeting affirmative action goals.

However, a survey conducted by American Express in 2011 found that it was increasingly hard for Small Business to get a government contract. The survey found that Small Business are having to spend an estimated 21% more in 2011 to compete for a government contract and succeeding  less.  As the average total investment made in seeking federal contracts has risen over the past year, bidding activity has declined by nearly half – both in prime and subcontracting activity. The average success rates for active small business contracts in both prime and subcontracting have declined as well – pointing to a more competitive and tighter environment.

Small business bring a number of advantages to the Government including lower overhead, more flexibility with ever changing requirements and increased innovation. As the saying goes, “A smaller ship is easier to turn.”  Also Small Business usually have fewer clients and therefore are more dedicated to […]

DOD Getting the Message on Reverse Auctions

As with all of government, the Department of Defense is facing slimmer budgets and looking at ways to save money. Basically as Ashton Carter, Deputy Secretary, Department of Defense, put it: “To do more, without more.”

In December 2010, John Young, a senior fellow at Potomac Institute for Policy Studies and a former U.S. undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics wrote an article for Defense News encouraging the Department of Defense to use reverse auctions to save money. Young stated in his article,”There is constant debate about acquisition practices, with simple and obvious steps frequently overlooked. Reverse auctioning can save money, increase competition, cut contract officer workload, reduce procurement complexity, provide transparency, and help prevent fraud and graft. Reverse auction tools should be added to the DoD and defense industry acquisition tool kit and used whenever possible to get maximum value for each taxpayer dollar.”

In October 2011, David C. Wyld, Professor of Management at Southeastern Louisiana, published a report for the IBM Center for the Business of Government titled “Reverse Auctioning: Saving Money and Increasing Transparency.” In this report, Dr. Wyld recommends that the government  adopt an auction first policy. Wyld estimates that the federal government could save  $8.9 billion by increasing use of reverse auctions. He estimates that the Department of defense alone could save over $6 billion. In addition to increased savings, his report indicates that there is increased transparency of the acquisition transactions. A case study of the Department of State found that increased use of reverse auctions also increased the competition among suppliers, and dramatically reduced the acquisition contract time for department staff.

Over the last decade the DOD has made a few attempts at using reverse auctioning, but has […]

Google+