Rep. Robert Andrews (D-NJ)

Rep. Robert Andrews (NJ) chairs the Defense Acquisition Reform Panel on the House Armed Services Committee.

The Department of Defense recently got an earful from the Defense Acquisition Reform Panel (DARP) over its “outdated” acquisition and contracting policies.  The panel’s criticisms centered largely on ill-suited “cultural issues” preventing the DOD from moving towards more IT-focused procurement methods.  Amber Corrin’s Inside DOD blog from Federal Computer Week gives a nice, high-level overview of this argument.

Recommendations made by the panel included:

  • Improved process for developing contract requirements
  • Performance-incentives for DOD’s acquisition workforce
  • Getting more value from the industrial base.

I can’t imagine the recommendations are anything the DOD hasn’t already realized.  As one of many DOD-contracted IT-providers, Partnet recognizes the changes DOD is implementing towards modernizing their IT-capabilities, particularly around acquisition.  The potential cost savings to taxpayers in finding smarter, faster ways to supply and equip our Warfighters is enormous.  And few know that better than the DOD.

However, the DARP report seems to imply that the DOD is sitting on its hands, meanwhile, letting old-fashioned acquisition protocol dictate the Department’s future.

Again, I’m pretty sure the DOD knows exactly what needs to done, and in many instance, is taking strong initiative to correct so-called “cultural issues”.  Government eCommerce, for instance, is one area where the DOD is making tremendous strides.

Debra Fryar has written a number of excellent posts on this blog illustrating exactly how the DOD is leveraging information technology towards streamlined acquisition and purchasing.  And DOD EMALL (which Partnet proudly built and operates, I might add) is a concrete example of the Department’s success so far.

Not to mention the DOD is also looking to technology for OCONUS souring and contracting solutions–specifically, the potential for web applications to optimize contingency contracts and purchasing from global vendors and local markets.

None of this is to say the DOD should ignore the DARP recommendations, or anybody else’s.  I simply believe in giving credit where credit is due.  (Though, I suppose with an operating budget as large as the DOD’s, you’re going to be an easier target for criticism than others . . . )