An Alternative to FSSI?

FSSI solutions provide easy access to its procurement vehicles, which offer business intelligence, best practice solutions, and greater discounts with volume increases.

Let’s Get the B2G Conversation Started — Part 2

It’s hard to imagine that there would be any reluctance to explore the possibilities for a project or product with others who have direct knowledge and expertise and yet, getting that conversation started seems to be the hardest part of doing business with the Government.

GamePay Wins Big with College Referees

Fall is in the air and most of America will be enjoying football over the holiday, but did you ever stop to think about how college referees get paid? Probably not.

By |November 27th, 2013|General|0 Comments|

Let’s Get the B2G Conversation Started — Part 1

I enjoyed reading Debra Fryar’s blog post, B2G Communication Mismatch. She is right to say that communication is not only about your message; it’s also about how you convey it. Communication 101: in order for communication to occur a sender, a message, a medium and a receiver must be present. Leave out even one link in the chain and the process fails. Contractors and federal government employees both must focus on communications media to ensure we meet in the right places.

So where are the right places? Debra mentions that, “68% of contractors said they would try to do more face to face visits and only 19% of government said they planned to.” Austere economic times, uncertain futures, shut downs and sequestration are creating a somewhat prickly environment, but I am wondering if this statistic has a very high variation from the norm. In my experience, government employees can have some odd notions about talking to contractors. I do not think there is anything new with the notion of government employees planning on fewer face-to-face communications.

But the nagging question remains: from where does this reluctance stem? Certainly during source selection sensitive periods the integrity of the acquisition process must be protected. Source selection officials must be very careful to avoid even the appearance of favoritism or technical leveling. Even being seen in public with a company representative that is competing for government business that is currently up for grabs can compromise the government employee.

But there are other times when talking to contractors is not only recommended, it’s smart. For example, in the acquisition planning stage and the post award stage. Having been both a government employee and a contractor I can assure you, we’re all […]

B2G Communication Mismatch

Business-to-Government has experienced a few bumps in the road over the past year: the GSA conference scandal, the Sequester restriction on training and travel budgets, the government program office’s reluctance to speak with industry, and now the government shut down. Indeed so much has happened in government over the last year to increase the challenge of B2G communications that I’d be hard-pressed to list it all. The folks over at Market Connections Inc and Boscobel Marketing Communications have published a white paper which sheds some light on the communication dilemma we are facing today and discusses the apparent mismatch of how industry and the government plan to communicate with each other under the current budget constraints. Let’s discuss some of the more interesting points they’ve presented.

The Difficulties of Talking to Your Government Customer

Seventy-two percent of agencies plan to attend fewer conferences and 57% say they will be hosting fewer conferences. Contractors are in step with these results with 50% stating they will attend fewer conferences. Government participants stated they would be turning more to webinars, reading publications in their field, and reviewing websites to gain knowledge. Contractors plan to have more personal discussions with government personnel in addition to updating their websites and producing white papers and case studies. The biggest discrepancy was in the area of face-to-face visits. Of contractors, 68% said they would try to do more face-to-face visits, while only 19% of government said they planned to do the same. This might explain why it is so hard to get an appointment to meet with government personnel.

A silver lining does appear in the findings however, especially for small businesses. Increased use of social media and website reviews by government personnel will make […]

By |October 28th, 2013|General|0 Comments|

A Look Back: eBusiness Retrospective Part II

With the Internet you could send large files to other people using “ftp” (this was the first time I remember using lower case letters for an acronym). And then another miracle happened: two people could look at the same thing on the Internet at the same time.

A Look Back: eBusiness Retrospective

Recently my friend and colleague Claudia “Scottie” Knott was inducted into the DLA Hall of Fame. This got me thinking about where she and I were in our careers when we met in the early 1980s. As everyone knows, the Department of Defense has always been an information technology leader and was an early participant in the development of the Internet. Leveraging the ability to make information, communications, and transactions available on a broad scale has had a positive impact on DOD business processes. I’m happy to say that Scottie and I were a part of that evolution at DLA and had big dreams for leveraging technology to support business processes—what we now call eBusiness. Today I’ll give you a look at this evolution up until the time of the Internet. Next week, we’ll continue the discussion with the significant innovations brought about in the post-Internet age.
Life before Big Data: Pre-Internet Times
Originally, data processing was accomplished on a local level. If two organizations needed to share data, they hand delivered or mailed completed forms to each other. Data had to be manually entered at each location where a computer would then process it to produce the desired effect (e.g., create paychecks, release stock from a warehouse, or bill a customer). Besides the duplicate labor, the margin for error was increased each time the data had to pass through another pair of hands to be processed. Punched cards were a great innovation. With punched cards, the margin of error was reduced because one computer could punch the card and the next computer could read the card, successfully preserving the information for data processing. This translated into measurable savings. But they had to be kept in […]

eCommerce for Government IS Different

The differences between government eCommerce and eCommerce for commercial business might be difficult to notice at first glance, but these differences are key to a successful government eCommerce solution.

Customers Voice High Praise for DOD EMALL

The DOD EMALL Program Office at the Defense Logistics Agency Headquarters recently sent a survey to customers asking the impact to their mission if DOD EMALL were no longer available. The application received high praise from the users. Here are just a few of their responses.

DLA Land and Maritime

“If we were to lose access to DOD EMALL Tire corridor, it would have a significant negative effect. Currently we use the website to validate NSN’s sources of supply for all DOD buyers and we provide our customers with validated spec sheets that they can use to verify the accuracy of the product they have received. There is no other database that will give me this ability. I am in that database every day reviewing, updating or retrieving data for a customer or a buyer. This section of the DOD EMALL has allowed other organization (TARDEC/TACOM) to easily assist with research and identify inconstancies with the data so that I can properly maintain the NSN’s through the cataloging actions. This is the best way for all organizations to see the same information on one system.”

DLA HQ

“It would make a big impact, I support 26 offices, so it would slow down our supply for the DLA offices I support.”

Magellan Aerospace

“As a broad stroke perspective from Procurement, lead time would be the greatest impact to our delivery schedule. The material purchased through DOD EMALL is not readily available on the open market or the OEM in most instances. GEAE is our main repair line, lead times ranging up to 725 days.”

USAF AFMC – Robins Air Force Base

“EMALL is very important to us at the F-15 SPO. We have a contract with Korean Air Lines (KAL) to complete the Programmed Depot Maintenance (PDM) on the USAF F-15s stationed at Kadena AS, Okinawa, […]

Government Acquisition Players Benefit from eCommerce

No matter whose perspective you use, eCommerce is a good idea for government acquisition. Unfortunately it is a much underutilized tool in the government acquisition tool box. Why do you think the federal government has been slow in utilizing this technology that has been around for almost 20 years?

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